Guide to Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park

Mount Assiniboine Peak
The Matterhorn of Canada, Mount Assiniboine, emerges from the clouds.

Hidden deep inside the Canadian Rockies is an entire provincial park without a single road. This oasis from the modern world has one of the most stunning landscapes capped with a peak that is often compared to the iconic Matterhorn of the Swiss Alps. This Matterhorn of the Canadian Rockies is called Mount Assiniboine. Even though there are no roads to this gorgeous place there are many ways to make your way there. This guide to Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park will help you plan for your journey, revealing the pros and cons of each route as well as the many trails that explore the heart of the park.

Guide to Mount Assiniboine Stats

  • Rating: Varies (See Below)
  • Distance: Varies (See Below)
  • Season: Late June to Early October
  • Camping Permits: Required for most campsites (See Below)
  • Important Trail Elevations:
    • Bottom of the Sunshine Gondola: 5,450′
    • Top of the Sunshine Gondola: 7,230’
    • Citadel Pass: 7,800’
    • Og Lake Campground: 6,790′
    • Assiniboine Lodge: 7,200′
    • Magog Lake Campground: 7,165′
    • Wonder Pass Elevation: 7,874′
    • Mount Shark Trailhead Elevation: 5,725’
  • Recommended Time: Varies on Itinerary (Recommendations Below)

Quick Guide to Mount Assiniboine Links

  1. Which Way?
  2. Backcountry Accommodations
  3. Day Hikes
  4. Logistics
  5. Sample Itineraries
  6. After the Journey

Which Way Should I Go?

Trail Guide to Mount Assiniboine
Mount Assiniboine rises above the well-beaten path inside the Canadian Provincial Park.

The crown jewel of Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park is the mountain peak itself. However, most visitors do not travel here to summit the frosty peak but rather to bask in its beauty from the shores of Magog Lake. While the destination is the same there are numerous ways to arrive here. In this guide to Mount Assiniboine, we will cover the three most common ways—a short helicopter flight, a thru-hike, or an out-n-back from either the Mount Shark Trailhead or Sunshine Village in Banff National Park. The trails are well signed in Banff National Park as well as Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park so directions are relatively easy. Still, you should still carry some form of GPS or a map for safety. We really like maps.me and the app worked great for us. Bring a backup battery to keep your device charged.

Backpacking from Sunshine Village

  • Route: Base of Gondola to Assiniboine Lodge
    • Rating: Strenuous
    • Distance: 21.25 miles
    • Elevation Gain: 4,953′
  • Route: Top of Gondola to Assiniboine Lodge
    • Rating: Less Strenuous but only slightly
    • Distance: 17.25 miles
    • Elevation Gain: 3,231′

The journey from Sunshine Village, for the most part, is a gorgeous traverse nearly all the way over several mountain passes. Hikers have the option of riding the gondola up the mountain which shaves 4 miles and more than 1722′ of elevation off of the journey. The gondola ride is a little pricey but the alternative is a fairly drab slog up the long road between Sunshine Village and the top of the gondola. The rest of the journey is a beautiful one. This guide to Mount Assiniboine recommends riding the gondola as it is a much better way to start such an epic adventure.

Backpacking from Mount Shark to Assiniboine Lodge

Assiniboine Provincial Park
The heart of Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park as seen from the Nublet.
  • Route: Via Wonder Pass
    • Rating: Strenuous
    • Distance: 16.5 miles
    • Elevation Gain: 2,185′
  • Route: Via Assiniboine Pass
    • Rating: Difficult
    • Distance: 16 miles
    • Elevation Gain: 1,509′

The route from the Mount Shark Trailhead can be taken over Assiniboine Pass or Wonder Pass. Wonder Pass is more beautiful but also the more difficult of the two options. Half of the journey via the Mount Shark Trailhead is below the treeline making it a less picturesque option to the Sunshine Village route. You can also make the journey from Mount Shark in on one pass and out over the other. This makes the Mount Shark Trailhead as an out-n-back slightly more appealing for those who prefer a loop. If you are skiing to the lodge during the winter season the Assiniboine Pass route should be taken.

Helicopter Flight

Route: Via Wonder Pass

  • Rating: Easy (lands very close to the lodge)
  • Distance: Varies based on Accomodation (See Below)
  • Elevation Gain: Minimal but varies based on Accomodation (See Below)

The Assiniboine helicopters fly from both the Canmore and Mount Shark helipads to the Assiniboine Lodge helipad at the foot of Magog Lake. You can only make a flight reservation once you have secured an accommodation reservation (info below). Helicopters only fly 3-days a week during the summer season, typically running from late June to early October. Make sure if you intend to travel by helicopter in or out that you plan accordingly. It is popular to fly in with your heavy gear, stay a few nights and then hike out to the Mount Shark trailhead with lighter gear or fly your gear back and hike out with just a day pack.

Thru-Hike Guide to Mount Assiniboine

Backpacking Assiniboine via Wonder Pass
Jennifer on the Wonder Pass Trail above Marvel Lake.
  • Distance: 37.75-miles (Base of Gondola in Sunshine Village to Mount Shark via Wonder Pass)
  • Elevation Gain: 7,138′

If you want to experience all that the Mount Assiniboine area of the Canadian Rockies has to offer you might consider thru-hiking the entire trail from Sunshine Village to the Mount Shark Trailhead. If you intend to ride the Gondola then start in the Sunshine Village area as this will have less elevation gain. However, if you intend to skip the gondola then start at Mount Shark as it is slightly higher than the base of the Gondola but also allows for steeper climbs and less steep descents.

Thru-hiking the Assiniboine Trail is an amazing journey. But the two trailheads are over an hour and a half drive apart making the logistics of getting from one trailhead to the other more difficult. If you have access to two vehicles you can leave one at each trailhead. There is a shuttle service for those who want to thru-hike but only have one vehicle. It is pricey. If you have multiple people traveling in your group drop the group off at the trailhead and have one person drive down and return on the shuttle. This is a 3-hour minimum return trip but it is cheaper than having everyone ride the shuttle. Your group can afford to stay a night in the Sunshine Mountain Lodge for about the same price as one seat on the shuttle.

Guide to Mount Assiniboine: Backcountry Accommodations

All of the lodges, huts, shelters, and most of the campgrounds found on the Assiniboine Trail require reservations months in advance. Each has a different time throughout the year when they become available but all of them will sell out the entire season within minutes of becoming available. You should plan ahead and have your itinerary completely scheduled using this guide to Mount Assiniboine so that you are ready to snag your spots the moment they become available.

Mount Assiniboine Trail Backcountry Lodges and Shelters

Assiniboine Lodge Cabins
The cabins at the Assiniboine Lodge are highly sought after accommodations in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park.

Assiniboine Lodge: The lodge was originally built as a ski lodge in 1928 and is typically open to guests for a distinct winter season and summer season. The lodge is very popular and reservations must be made well in advance (usually in January for the summer). The lodge typically has a tea time in the afternoon that anyone is allowed to partake in for a small fee. It is very enjoyable and highly recommended.

Naiset Huts: Located a third of a mile from the Assiniboine Lodge are the Naiset Huts. These huts provide a good, affordable alternative to the rather pricey Assiniboine Lodge for those looking to stay inside a warm building rather than a tent. An enclosed central cooking shelter is provided as well. Reservations must be made well in advance and are typically available in January.

Bryant Creek Shelter: The Bryant Creek Shelter is located about halfway between Assiniboine Lodge and the Mount Shark Trailhead in Banff National Park. While not as luxurious as the accommodation options inside the Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park this small, reservable shelter allows those who do not like sleeping in tents a way to hike into the Assiniboine area. You must still travel with all other necessary gear for camping but you don’t need a tent. Reservations are made through Banff National Park’s backcountry system and those sites typically become available in mid-January.

Mount Assiniboine Backcountry Campgrounds

Magog Campground
A reservation for camping at the backcountry campground at Magog Lake in Assiniboine Provincial Park is one of the hardest sites to get but it is an amazing place to spend a night or three.

All campgrounds in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park come with access to water, bear boxes, a cooking area, grey water disposal basins, and an outhouse that are usually supplied with toilet paper (bring your own as a backup). Reservations are required from most campgrounds but are not site-specific. They usually become available four months to the day in advance.

Magog Lake Campground: Located nearly 1.25-miles from the Assiniboine Lodge on the northwest corner of the lake. This is the largest and most popular camping area in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park. The campground has 40 individual sites scattered throughout the trees. One of the cooking areas is covered providing shelter in inclement weather.

Og Lake: Located about 3.25-miles to the north of the Assiniboine Lodge, Og Lake Campground is very small with only 7 tent pads. The campground is situated in a gorgeous area. It is, however, a very exposed campground with only small shrubs to shelter campers from the weather.

O’Brian Meadows: Groups of 15 or more people only are allowed in this campground located about 1.5-miles from the Assiniboine Lodge. (Closed for the 2021 season.)

Porcupine Creek Campground: Located 9.75-miles to the north of the Assiniboine Lodge and 13-miles from the base of the Sunshine Village Gondola, this is the only free and still first-come, first-served campground available on the Assiniboine Trail. The campsites are accessed via a small spur trail that loops off of the main trail. It is well-marked but adds a little distance and elevation to the overall route. The water source here has been known to go dry late in the season.

Banff Backcountry Campgrounds on the Assiniboine Trail (North to South)

All of these campsites are located in Banff National Park and reservations must be made in advance. Although no specific site is reserved the campsites are marked and the campgrounds have outhouses (bring your own toilet paper), bear boxes, a cooking area, and are located close to water sources for filtration.

Howard Douglas Lake: Located 13-miles to the north from the Assiniboine Lodge and over 9-miles from the base of the gondola, this campground is often used as an overnight for people traveling south from Sunshine Village. It is actually a very pretty campsite located very close to the lakeshore.

Allenby Junction: Located 2.5 miles to the east of Assiniboine Pass and 10-miles from the Mount Shark Trailhead, this is the closest campsite in Banff National Park to the heart of Assiniboine. It is typically used as a basecamp for exploring Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park once Magog and Og are full.

Marvel Lake Campground: Located 8-miles from the Assiniboine Lodge via Wonder Pass and 8.5-miles from Mount Shark. This campground makes for a great overnight when traveling south. The name is misleading as it is located deep in the forest nearly a mile from the lake’s shore.

McBride’s Campground: This campground is situated very close to the Marvel Lake Trail (Wonder Pass) and Bryant Creek Trail (Assiniboine Pass) junction. It is about 7-miles from the Assiniboine Lodge via Assiniboine Pass.

Guide to Mount Assiniboine: Day Hikes

Assiniboine Overlook - Canadian Rockies backcountry
Jake stands on the Niblet overlooking the Assiniboine Provincial Park landscape.

Nub Peak Trail

Nublet View
The view towards the north from the Nublet.
  • Route: From the Assiniboine Lodge
  • Rating: Moderate to Strenuous
  • Distance: 8-miles Total
  • Elevation Gain: 1,840′
  • Trail Elevations:
    • Niblet: 7,820′
    • Nublet: 8338′
    • Nub Peak: 9,039′

The iconic view of Mount Assiniboine rising above a landscape dotted with beautiful turquoise lakes is found on the Nub Peak trail. Very few people who venture up the slopes hike the path all the way to Nub Peak. The views from Niblet, which is a small shoulder on the way up to Nub Peak, are actually some of the best views found on this trail. The trail to get to the Niblet is a fairly moderate ascent by Rocky Mountain standards. It only gains a little over 600′ in 2 miles. The hike to the Niblet is the must-do day hike in this guide to Mount Assiniboine.

Getting from the Niblet to the Nublet is much steeper gaining the next 500′ in less than half a mile. However, the Nublet has amazing views of not only the Magog area but also views to the north. While the hike is more difficult and the terrain is rockier the exposure to a serious fall is not extreme.

The journey on to Nub Peak is not for the faint of heart as the trail traverses a narrow ridge with steep drops on both sides of the trial. There is also still 700′ worth of ascent after crossing the ridge to obtain the peak. The view from the top is a very scenic 360 degree panorama. However, Mount Assisinoine is somewhat obstructed by Sunburst Peak making the views of the iconic mountain less epic than those found along the way.

Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop

Cerulean Lake
Cerulean Lake with Sunburst Peak is one of three beautiful lakes to be found in the heart of Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park’s Lake Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop Trail.
  • Route: From the Magog Lake Campground
  • Rating: Moderately-Easy
  • Distance: 5.25-miles Total
  • Elevation Gain: 719′

This relatively easy hike first strolls along the turquoise-colored Sunburst Lake with the sheer walls of Sunburst Peak rising out of the lakeshore. There is a small cabin here once owned by Baroness Elizabeth von Rummel. Next are the rich blue waters of Cerulean Lake. After a moderate climb up and over a hillside, the path drops down to the beautiful Elizabeth Lake named after Rummel with the slopping side of Nub Peak rising out of it. Passing the lake the trail loops back to Cerulean Lake via a circuitous route through the dense forest.

Windy Ridge (8,845′)

  • Route: From the Assiniboine Lodge
  • Rating: Difficult
  • Distance: 9-miles Total
  • Elevation Gain: 1,845′

The Windy Ridge is a high altitude saddle along the continental divide between Og Mountain and an unnamed peak to the north. The journey to the Windy Ridge is a well-beaten and well-signed path found to the north of the Assiniboine Lodge. The Windy Ridge provides epic views west over Og Lake with Mount Assiniboine Peak rising in the distance. Also from the top, there are equally epic views to be discovered looking east from the cliff’s edge. Just be careful because it can be windy.

Wonder Peak (9,305′)

  • Route: From the Assiniboine Lodge
  • Rating: Strenuous
  • Distance: 8-miles Total
  • Elevation Gain: 2,194′

If you are looking for panoramic mountain top views of the Mount Assiniboine area without having to scale Mount Assiniboine itself with ropes and ice axes head for Wonder Peak. The views of not only the Mount Assiniboine area but also the Marvel Lake area of Banff are gorgeous. The journey is relatively easy following the well-beaten path up to Wonder Pass (7,806′). At the pass, you have traveled two of the four miles to the top but you have climbed less than a fourth of the total elevation. From the pass, the trail up Wonder Peak breaks east away from the main trail and becomes much steeper. The Wonder Peak Trail is less established often crossing loose skree. It can take some route-finding skills to summit the peak.

Wonder Pass

Wonder Pass (7,874′) and the easier Assiniboine Pass can both be taken to Mount Assiniboine from the Mount Shark Trailhead. While beautiful there is no need to travel over Wonder Pass if you summit Wonder Peak. The views along the Wonder Pass Trail are stunning but you will have a better view of the same terrain while summiting Wonder Peak. Take the easier Assiniboine Pass route if traveling to or from the Mount Shark Trailhead if you intend to summit Wonder Peak.

Guide to Mount Assiniboine: Logistics

Mount Assiniboine and Magog
Mount Assiniboine rises above the trees that line Magog Lake.

The Parking Lots

In general, the Sunshine Village parking lot gets more traffic and is considered a safer place to leave a vehicle than the Mount Shark parking lot. Don’t leave valuables within sight in either location.

Water

Water is abundant throughout much of the Mount Assiniboine Trail and all the campgrounds along the trail have access to either a water source or an actual water spigot. We suggest carrying enough water to make the journey between campgrounds but other water sources do exist and could be filtered. Filtering all water sources including the taps is recommended. The only major area with little access to water is the section from Citadel Pass through the Valley of Rocks to Og Lake.

Toilets

Outhouses are located at each campground but you will need to bring your own toilet paper. The ones in Banff National Park tend to be very rustic and often look like they are one strong wind away from imploding. In contrast, the outhouses inside Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park are in good shape and well-maintained. The toilets behind the Assiniboine Lodge are almost palatial by backcountry standards.

Backpacking Gear

The Canadian Rockies are extremely unpredictable. Summer hiking conditions can range from hot to dangerously cold. Snowstorms can happen any time of the year as we found out on our journey through Assiniboine. The key to having a successful trip is being prepared with gear that is flexible for these weather conditions. Our Backpacking gear is designed for this kind of terrain and we’ve done an entire post on what we carry into the backcountry complete with ratings of importance for those new to backpacking. Check it out here.

Bear spray and bug spray are crucial when exploring Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park. You will most likely see a bear if you hike in from Mount Shark as the first 8 miles are prime bear country. They will most likely leave you alone but bring the spray for safety. The mosquitos will not leave you alone and they are overwhelming throughout much of the prime summer season. Bug nets are highly recommended for this journey.

Food Storage

All the campgrounds along the entire length of the Assiniboine Trail from Sunshine to Mount Shark have bear-rated locker containers. The containers are typically communal but they are abundant enough that should you want to claim one and lock away your supplies from would-be thieves you are able to do so at most of the campgrounds. We found no need for this and our supplies were not tampered with. I just really appreciate not having to carry my own bear canister on this journey.

Tea Time

(Cancelled for the 2021 season.) Every day during the summer season the Assiniboine Lodge puts on a tea time for guests and campers alike. This is an enjoyable time to come and have some tea and snacks for a small fee. Bring cash and plan on attending this hour-long festivity which usually starts at 4:00 PM (MST). The lodge typically has a fire lit making for a great atmosphere. On warmer days the deck overlooks the gorgeous terrain making it the ideal spot to enjoy the snack. The teas are excellent as well as the cream cakes. A cheese plater is also available that we did not partake in but it did look tasty.

Seasons

Summer in Mount Assiniboine
It was July 18th and our first day of hiking the Assiniboine Trail. Snowstorms can come on quickly at any time in the Canadian Rockies.

The summer backpacking season officially starts in Late-June and runs through early October. However, if you are averse to hiking in the snow you should limit your plans from Late-July to Early September. If you like the snow then you should consider cross-country skiing during the winter. Assiniboine’s winter season typically starts in early February and runs through late March.

Time Zone

Even though Mount Assiniboine is located across the continental divide in British Columbia the park remains on Mountain Standard Time. This is due to the fact that the majority of visitors and goods come into the park from the towns on the Alberta side of the divide.

Sample Itineraries

Sunburst Peak
Sunburst Peak is one of the many beautiful mountains waiting to be discovered when exploring the heart of Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park.

Whether you fly in by helicopter, do an out-n-back via one of the two trailheads, or backpack all the way from one trailhead to the other, there is not a bad choice when it comes to exploring Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park. We suggest staying in the heart of the Mount Assiniboine area at the Lodge, Hut, or Magog Campground for three nights. This will give you enough time to fully explore the area if you have nice weather. If you aren’t so lucky it will give your itinerary some flexibility to wait for the mountain to peek out from the clouds.

Helicopter In & Out

Stay in the same place every night. Either the Assiniboine Lodge, Magog Lake Campground, or Naiset Hut.

Day 1: Arrive and hike the out-n-back to Windy Ridge. Enjoy Tea at the lodge and stay the night in the same location.

Day 2: Hike the Niblet for sunrise and then continue to Nub Peak. Hike Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop upon return.

Day 3: Catch the Sunrise from the shore of Magog Lake. Hike the out-n-back to Wonder Peak.

Day 4: Catch the sunrise from Sunburst Lake and fly back.

Helicopter In & Hike Out

Stay in the same place every night. Either the Assiniboine Lodge, Magog Lake Campground, or Naiset Hut.

Day 1: Arrive and hike the out-n-back to Windy Ridge. Enjoy Tea at the lodge and stay the night in the same location.

Day 2: Hike the Niblet for sunrise and then continue up Nub Peak. Hike Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop in the afternoon.

Day 3: Catch the Sunrise from the shore of Magog Lake. Hike the out-n-back to Wonder Peak.

Day 4: Fly your gear back and hike over Assiniboine Pass back to Mount Shark Trailhead. It is a long 16-mile hike from the lodge but very doable carrying only a day pack.

Optional 5th Day: Add a 5th day and hike out with all your gear camping on the 4th night at McBride’s Campground.

Out-n-Back from Mount Shark

Cone Mountain
Cone Mountain rises tall above Spray Lake. This is one of many iconic scenes to be found on the journey from the Mount Shark Trailhead.

Day 1: Backpack to Allenby Junction and set up camp for the night. (10-miles)

Day 2: Hike over Assiniboine Pass and set up camp at Magog Lake, the Lodge, or one of the huts (6-7 miles). Hike Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop in the afternoon.

Day 3: Hike the Niblet for sunrise and then continue to the Nub. Enjoy Tea at the lodge and stay the night in the same location.

Day 4: Catch the Sunrise from the shore of Magog Lake. Hike the out-n-back to Windy Ridge. Stay the night in the same location.

Day 5: Pack up camp and then hike Wonder Peak stashing your backpacks near the Wonder Pass junction. Make sure all food is in a bear canister or in your day pack. Camp at Marvel Lake Campground. This journey is about 10.5-miles total.

Day 6: Hike back to the Mount Shark Trailhead.

Thru Hike from Sunshine Village to Mount Shark

Day 1: Ride the gondola up, and take the spur to the Rock Isle Lake viewpoint. Continue hiking over Citadel Pass and camp at Porcupine Campground. (9.5-miles with spur)

Day 2: Hike to the Assiniboine Lodge stopping for lunch at Og Lake. Set up camp at Magog Lake, the Lodge, or one of the huts (9-10 miles). Hike Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop in the afternoon.

Day 3: Hike the Niblet for sunrise and then continue up Nub Peak. Enjoy Tea at the lodge and stay the night in the same location.

Day 4: Catch the Sunrise from the shore of Magog Lake. Hike the out-n-back to Windy Ridge. Stay the night in the same location.

Day 5: Pack up camp and then hike Wonder Peak stashing your backpacks near the Wonder Pass junction. Make sure all food is in a bear canister or in your day pack. Camp at Marvel Lake Campground. This journey is 10.5 to 11.5 miles total.

Day 6: Hike to the Mount Shark Trailhead where you will pick up your second car or grab the prearranged shuttle back to Sunshine Village.

Thru Hike from Mount Shark to Sunshine Village

Og Lake Camping Platform
One of the camping platforms at the Og Lake Campground in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park.

Day 1: Backpack from the Mount Shark Trailhead to Marvel Lake Campground. This is an easy 8 miles.

Day 2: Pack up camp and climb up Wonder Pass. Stash your backpacks near the junction and summit Wonder Peak. Make sure all food is in a bear canister or in your day pack. Finish hiking to the main Assiniboine area and set up camp at Magog Lake, the Lodge, or one of the huts. This journey is 10.5 to 11.5 miles but it has a lot of elevation gain so start early.

Day 3: Hike the Niblet for sunrise and then continue to Nub Peak. Hike Sunburst & Elizabeth Lake Loop in the afternoon. Enjoy Tea at the lodge and stay the night in the same location.

Day 4: Hike the out-n-back to Windy Ridge. If you are staying in a tent I would probably move to Og Lake Campground to make the 5th day a little easier.

Day 5: Pack up camp and backpack to Howard Douglas Lake Campground. 13 to 14 miles from Assiniboine Area. 9.75-miles from Og Lake.

Day 6: Pack up and finish backpacking to Sunshine Village at the base of the Gondola. Stop by the Rock Isle Lake viewpoint. This is 9-.5 miles with the spur and mostly downhill after an initial ascent.

After the Journey to Assiniboine

Mount Assiniboine above the Clouds
Mount Assiniboine and Mount Magog rise out of the clouds.

Campground Accommodations

We definitely recommend spending more time in Banff National Park in this guide to Mount Assiniboine. You will need to set up a front-country campsite reservation for Banff National Park months in advance. Our favorite campsite is Two-Jack Lakeside but if you want better access to the Banff township or need cell service then the Tunnel Mountain Campground is the way to go. Both are good options for camping with hot showers. We’ve done an entire post on front-country camping in the Canadian Rockies. Check that out so you know what to expect.

Hotel Accommodations

If you prefer a hotel room to a tent after a few days in the backcountry, we suggest going all out and staying at the gorgeous Fairmont Chateau on the shore of Lake Louise. If you are looking for a more budget-friendly option we suggest Banff’s Irwin’s Mountain Inn or Canmore’s Rocky Mountain Inn. Both are beautiful, clean hotels in very good locations for further exploration of Banff National Park.

Restaurants

After coming off a five-day journey through Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park our first priority was a hot shower immediately followed by a hot meal. The town of Banff, as well as Canmore, both have some excellent eateries. We love the Eddie Burger Bar in Banff. Jennifer believes their Rocky Mountain Burger to now be the gold standard for all other burger comparisons. When in Canmore you really can’t go wrong with the Rocky Mountain Flatbread Co. This is a small franchise restaurant with tasty wood stove pizzas.

Guide to Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park

Guide to Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park
Pin this post to your Pinterest board to easily return to it later.

Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park is like many other parks that preserve the natural beauty for all to come and enjoy. Getting to Assiniboine and exploring its beauty is more of a challenge due to a lack of roads but this makes the park sheltering the Matterhorn of Canada all the more special. We hope this guide to Mount Assiniboine helps you discover this beautiful place and appreciate the solitude that is found when roads don’t encroach on the most magical places. Not everything in life needs to be easy. A difficult journey often makes the destination even more special.

Don’t forget to share this Guide to Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park with your friends.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CommentLuv badge